Community Development

Nancy Andriano, Program Manager

Memorial Town Hall
534 Loudon Road
Latham, NY 12110

(518) 783-2718
(518) 786-6525
Email Us

Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. (closed from 12:00 to 1:00 for lunch)
Introduction

The Town of Colonie, in cooperation with the Villages of Colonie and Menands, has been participating in the federal Community Development Block Grant program since 1978, the Section 8 Rental Assistance program since 1979, and the HOME program as part of the Colonie Schenectady Troy consortium since 1992. In 1981, the Town Board created the Community Development Department in order to efficiently administer these programs. It is the Town Board's responsibility to determine what programs they want to fund with the Federal funds allocated to the Town. To assist them in determining what projects the Town should undertake each year, the Town Board appoints a Community Development Citizen Advisory Committee with each member serving a three-year term.

The major emphasis of the programs pursued by Community Development has been to preserve the existing housing stock; construct and replace public facilities and infrastructure; provide rental assistance and affordable new housing for individuals and families with moderate income or special needs; and extend supportive services aimed at improving the quality of life and self-sufficiency of those individuals and families that could benefit from such services.

Community Development is responsible for compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Fair Housing Act, and for affirmatively furthering fair housing. The department is the point of contact for the Census Bureau and disseminates census information to Town departments and to the public.

In 1995, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development revised its regulations and required municipalities to prepare a Five Year Consolidated Plan in order for the Town and non-profit agencies who wish to provide services in the Town to access funds from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development and the New York State Division of Housing and Community Renewal (DHCR). This plan describes our housing and community development needs and priorities and the steps we would take to further develop partnerships among government agencies and between government and private groups in order to marshal government and private resources to achieve intended public purposes. Each year hence a one-year action plan which lists the activities the Town would undertake to address priority needs and local objectives during that year is submitted to HUD.

Citizens are encouraged to comment on the Community Development Plan and all activities by:
Telephone: (518) 783-2718
Fax: (518) 786-6525
Mail:
Town of Colonie
Community Development
Memorial Town Hall, P.O. Box 508
Newtonville, NY 12128

Five Year Consolidated Plan

The Town of Colonie has developed its 2015 Consolidated Plan which was submitted to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) on May 14, 2015.

Consolidated planning is a collaborative process whereby a community establishes a unified vision for community development actions with emphasis on citizen participation and consultation with relevant governmental jurisdictions and public and private agencies. The Consolidated Plan is the result of this process, which combines the planning, application and reporting requirements for the Town's two (2) federal programs, the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and HOME Investment Partnerships, into one document.

As required under Consolidated Plan regulations, the Town of Colonie contacted all potentially interested organizations to solicit input in developing our priority housing and community development needs and in defining improvement strategies that bring needs and resources together.

Each year the Town seeks community input, solicits proposals and receives recommendations from the Community Development Citizen Advisory Committee on activities to further address the Town's priorities. The Town Board then finalizes its decision and this Action Plan is submitted to HUD for approval.

Therefore, we would like all Town and Village residents to express to us what the Town of Colonie's housing and community development needs should be.

Needs that should be addressed include:

  • housing needs (renter and owner);
  • lead based paint needs;
  • barriers to affordable housing;
  • public facility/infrastructure needs;
  • public service needs (e.g. elderly, youths, substance abuse, employment training, etc.);
  • accessibility needs;
  • historic preservation needs, and;
  • economic development needs.

Click here for Strategic Plan Narrative Final.

Block Grant Entitlement Program

Since its inception in 1978, the Town of Colonie Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program has received $18,063,085. The Town of Colonie is an entitlement community and is allocated a specified amount of CDBG funds each year based on a formula which includes population (must exceed 50,000), extent of poverty, growth lag, housing overcrowding, and age of housing. Community Development Block Grant Entitlement funds may be used for residential rehabilitation, public facilities and improvements, removal of architectural barriers, and public services. To be eligible, all projects must either benefit low or moderate-income persons, prevent or eliminate slums or blight, or meet the criteria of an urgent need. Slums and blighted areas and urgent needs must be so designated by the Town. At least 70 percent of the funds must benefit low-moderate income persons that is those persons whose income is under 80 percent of the Albany Schenectady Troy area median income.

2016 Entitlement
PUBLIC SERVICES:

1 School Age Child Care Scholarship Programs
Operated by Colonie Youth Center, Inc.
Townwide
$15,000
2 Bright Horizons Adult Day Services
Operated by Colonie Senior Service Centers, Inc.
Townwide
$4,000
PUBLIC FACILITIES:
1 Hendrick Avenue Water System Improvement Design Project (Water Main Replacement)
Village of Menands
$10,000
REHABILITATION ACTIVITIES:
1 Residential Rehabilitation Assistance to qualified low- and moderate-income owner/occupied households in the Town and Villages
Townwide
$210,838
ADMINISTRATION $59,959
TOTAL $326,087

Download or view the "Action Plan Year Two" summary.

What is the First Time Homebuyer Program?

The Town of Colonie First Time Homebuyer program provides a subsidy to participants to purchase homes in the Town of Colonie, Village of Colonie, and Village of Menands. Funds for this program are provided by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) through the Colonie Schenectady Troy consortium. The program is designed for qualified households with incomes below 80 percent of the area median income who are capable of qualifying for and repaying a mortgage. The subsidy is a grant which must be repaid if the participants do not own and occupy the home as their principal place of residence for a period of time as mandated by HUD at the time of closing. Participants are responsible for all costs above the subsidy.

Who is Eligible?

Families and individuals who meet the household income requirements (see chart) are eligible for the Town of Colonie First Time Homebuyer program if they:

  • are a "First Time Homebuyer" as defined below:
    • a household that has not owned a home during the three year period immediately prior to purchase with HOME funds
    • or
    • a displaced homemaker is an adult individual who has not worked full-time, full year in the labor force for a number of years but has, during such years, worked primarily without pay to care for the home and household, and is unemployed or underemployed and is experiencing difficulty in obtaining or upgrading employment
    • or
    • a single parent is an individual who is unmarried, divorced, or legally separated from a spouse and has one or more minor children for whom the individual has custody or joint custody, or is pregnant at the point when the property will be occupied
  • have a good credit history for the past 12 months
  • have at least one year of stable employment/income
  • have an established savings account with an average balance of $1,500
  • qualify for a conventional loan (note and mortgage)
  • provide evidence that they can make the monthly mortgage payments

A household's current gross income from all sources cannot exceed 80% of the area median income.

Household Size Annual Income Limit
1 $46,550
2 $53,200
3 $59,850
4 $66,500
5 $71,850
6 $77,150
7 $82,500
8 or more $87,800
What Properties are Eligible?

Properties to be purchased using Town of Colonie First Time Homebuyer funds must:

  • be located in the Town of Colonie, Village of Colonie, and Village of Menands
  • meet Federal Housing Quality Standards at the time of closing
  • be modest housing as defined by HUD
  • pass a lead-based paint visual assessment
  • be a single family, condo, or townhouse
  • be the buyer's principal residence
How to obtain a First Time Homebuyer Application Form?

The Town of Colonie First Time Homebuyer program is administered by the Community Development Department. If you think you may be eligible and would like to be placed on the waiting list, you may call our office at 518-783-2718 or you may download the First Time Homebuyer Application by completing this form.

Public Service Projects
School Age Child Care Scholarship Program

The Colonie Youth Center (CYC) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization formed in 1965 by a group of parents and teens that were interested in developing wholesome activities for children in the Town of Colonie. In the last 46 years the organization has developed three major areas of service: school age child care, counseling, and recreation.
Two of CYC's most vital School Age Child Care (SACC) services are the beforeschool program and the afterschool program. Also known as “Latchkey” programs these services provide working parents with affordable quality child care for their children during non-school hours. Currently, the CYC SACC Department offers 12 before school and 15 afterschool programs all located in the Town of Colonie. These programs are offered everyday that school is in session in the school buildings of the North Colonie and South Colonie School Districts. Each site is registered with the New York State Office of Children and Family Services. They serve approximately 700 children per year with at least 45 of the families falling into the category of low-and moderate-income.
With block grant funding, the School Age Child Care Scholarship Program provides partial scholarships to those low- and moderate-income families who need before-school and after-school child care but are unable to afford them. It is CYC's belief that families must have some financial responsibility for this service therefore, no full scholarships are provided. Instead, eligible families have their fees reduced between 20 to 80 percent. The majority of the families in need of financial assistance are single-parent families where the parent is employed in an entry-level job.

Bright Horizons Adult Day Services

Colonie Senior Service Centers, Inc. (CSSC) was established in 1981 as a duly authorized 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. For over 30 years, the organization has served seniors and their families in the Town of Colonie and greater Capital Region. CSSC offers many programs and services including the Bright Horizons Adult Day Service Program. Bright Horizons is a structured, cost-effective, and comprehensive community-based social adult day services program which provides functionally impaired individuals over the age of 60 with socialization, supervision, and monitoring; personal care; and nutrition in a protective setting between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday at three locations in the Town of Colonie: Bright Horizons at Beltrone (Beltrone Living Center, 6 Winners Circle), Bright Horizons at Carondelet (St. Joseph's Provincial House, Watervliet Shaker Road), and Bright Horizons at Pine Grove (Pine Grove United Methodist Church, 1580 Central Avenue) This program allows physically and mentally frail older persons to remain with their family and in the community, providing social and emotional support in a secure and supervised day program. Bright Horizons provides an effective, efficient, and flexible solution for both caregivers and seniors to allow the elderly to age in place.
For many seniors and their families the minimal cost of this program is a fraction of the cost they would incur to have the services of a home health aide. They recognize the value of the program and have the ability to pay. For others the benefits are highly valued, but they lack the ability to pay. CSSC works with both the Albany County Department of Aging and Catholic Charities to provide charity care for 8 to 10 families, but CSSC still has another 8 to 10 families who would benefit from Bright Horizons but who cannot afford this service. Block grant funding will be used to provide scholarships to these low- and moderate-income seniors.

What is the Residential Rehabilitation Program?

The Town of Colonie Residential Rehabilitation program provides grants to low-and moderate-income families who reside in the Town of Colonie, Village of Colonie, and Village of Menands who want to repair their homes. Funds for the program are provided by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development through the Town's Community Development Block Grant. Income determines what percent grant a family will receive with grants ranging from 40 percent to 100 percent of the cost of bringing the home up to Federal Housing Qualification Standards. Applications are processed on a first-come, first-served basis.

The following maximum total project costs have been established for all participants in the program:

  • Owner Occupied Manufactured Housing: $7,500 limit
  • Owner Occupied Single Unit: $14,000 limit

Participants are responsible for all costs above these established limits.

Although residential rehabilitation is a program for low-income households, it is not a social service program. Applicants are not entitled to a benefit based on financial need. That is, while a threshold level of demonstrated financial need is required to qualify for the program, the services provided are neither equal for all applicants, nor are they proportionate to financial distress. The level of service is defined by the deficiencies revealed by the dwelling unit inspection report.

Note: Grant funds must be repaid if the recipient does not own and occupy the home as their principal place of residence for a minimum period of two years from the date of completion of the improvement as determined by the Community Development Department or repay the amount of the grant.

The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has issued federal regulations implementing sections of Title X of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 (Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992) that became effective September 15, 2000. Those regulations apply to all federally funded residential housing activities, including the Town of Colonie Residential Rehabilitation Program. The requirements apply to housing built before 1978, the year lead-based paint was banned nationwide for consumer use. The statute requires a paint inspection and risk assessment of components scheduled for renovation, components with deteriorated painted surfaces, impact surfaces, and friction surfaces.

If the paint testing indicates the absence of lead-based paint, paint stabilization and interim controls are not required. If the paint testing indicates the presence of lead-based paint, a general contractor trained in safe-work practices will perform interim controls of all lead-based paint hazards identified in the risk assessment. Following interim controls, either the risk assessor or paint inspector shall perform a clearance examination. In certain situations, temporary relocation of occupants will be required during hazard reduction activities. Homeowner applicants should be aware that this is a voluntary relocation in that it is a condition of participation in this program and that they must relocate at their own expense.

Who is Eligible?

Families and individuals who meet the household income requirements (see chart) are eligible if they:

  • Own and occupy the residence to be rehabilitated
  • Residence must be located in the Town of Colonie, Village of Colonie, or Village of Menands
  • Can provide proof of stable ownership (i.e. taxes are current; note, mortgage and/or sales agreement contain a notice of procedure and/or a grace period)

A household's current gross income from all sources cannot exceed 80% of the area median income.

Household Size Annual Income Limit
1 $46,550
2 $53,200
3 $59,850
4 $66,500
5 $71,850
6 $77,150
7 $82,500
8 or more $87,800

Since this program is designed to assist persons with limited financial resources, homeowner applicants with assets (not including a primary residence) totaling more than $50,000 shall not be eligible to participate in this program regardless of any other income calculation.

Who to Contact?

The Town of Colonie Residential Rehabilitation program is administered by the Community Development Department. If you think you may be eligible, you can apply by:

  • Calling 518-783-2718 for additional information and for an application.
  • Printing out an application form, completing it, and mailing it to Town of Colonie, Community Development, Memorial Town Hall, Newtonville, NY 12128.
What is it?

The Town of Colonie Rental Assistance program is a federally-funded program that assists low-income families and individuals with paying their rent. Preference in assigning funding under the program is given to families and individuals that live or work in the Town of Colonie . If you are eligible and if the rental unit you live in now or the rental unit you want to move to qualifies, the Town of Colonie Rental Assistance program can reduce the rent you pay, provide you with better housing, and increase your purchasing power.

Who is Eligible?

Families and individuals with gross annual income that does not exceed allowable amounts (see chart) are eligible for the Town of Colonie Rental Assistance program if they meet one of the following criteria:

  • Individuals who are age 62 or older, disabled, or displaced by government action
  • Families of two or more members
  • Single persons who are under age 62, not disabled, and not displaced (although eligible single persons who are under age 62, not disabled, and not displaced are given a low preference and are not usually housed under the program)

A household's current gross income from all sources cannot exceed 50% of the area median income.

Household Size Annual Income Limit
1 $29,100
2 $33,250
3 $37,400
4 $41,550
5 $44,900
6 $48,200
7 $51,550
8 or more $54,850
Who to Contact?

The Town of Colonie Rental Assistance program is administered by a private consultant. If you think you may be eligible, you may contact them at 518-372-8846 for additional information and for an application for the Town of Colonie Rental Assistance program.

Fair Housing - It's Your Right


"One America" -- an America were no one is denied an opportunity to build a better life because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, family status, or disability.

In April 1998, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development celebrated Fair Housing Month marking the 30th anniversary of Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 -- the Federal Fair Housing Law. The Fair Housing Act protects everyone! No one can be denied housing because of his or her race, color, religion, sex, national origin, familial status, or disability. The US Department of Housing and Urban Development enforces the Fair Housing Act which protects these rights. The Town of Colonie has an Affirmative Action Plan for Fair Housing.

The Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination in housing because of:

  • Race or color
  • National origin
  • Religion
  • Sex
  • Familial status (including children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18)
  • Handicap

What housing is covered?
The Fair Housing Act covers most housing. In some circumstances, the Act exempts owner-occupied buildings with no more than four units, single-family housing sold or rented without the use of a broker, and housing operated by organizations and private clubs that limit occupancy to members.

In the Sale and Rental of Housing:
No one may take any of the following actions based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status or handicap:

  • Refuse to rent or sell housing
  • Refuse to negotiate for housing
  • Make housing unavailable
  • Deny a dwelling
  • Set different terms, conditions or privileges for sale or rental of a dwelling
  • Provide different housing services or facilities
  • Falsely deny that housing is available for inspection, sale, or rental
  • For profit, persuade owners to sell or rent (blockbusting) or
  • Deny anyone access to or membership in a facility or service (such as a multiple listing service) related to the sale or rental of housing

In Mortgage Lending:
No one may take any of the following actions based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status or handicap:

  • Refuse to make a mortgage loan
  • Refuse to provide information regarding loans
  • Impose different terms or conditions on a loan
  • Discriminate in appraising property
  • Refuse to purchase a loan or set different terms or conditions for purchasing a loan

In Addition:
It is illegal for anyone to:

  • Threaten, coerce, intimidate or interfere with anyone exercising a fair housing right or assisting others who exercise that right
  • Advertise or make any statement that indicates a limitation or preference based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, or handicap. This prohibition against discriminatory advertising applies to single- family and owner-occupied housing that is otherwise exempt from the Fair Housing Act.

If you or someone associated with you:

  • Have a physical or mental disability (including hearing, mobility and visual impairments, chronic alcoholism, chronic mental illness, AIDS, AIDS Related Complex and mental retardation) that substantially limits one or more major life activities.
  • Have a record of such a disability or are regarded as having such a disability.

Your landlord may not:

  • Refuse to let you make reasonable modifications to your dwelling or common use areas, at your expense, if necessary for the handicapped person to use the housing. (Where reasonable, the landlord may permit changes only if you agree to restore the property to its original condition when you move).
  • Refuse to make reasonable accommodations in rules, policies, practices or services if necessary for the handicapped person to use the housing.

Example:
A building with a "no pets" policy must allow a visually impaired tenant to keep a guide dog.

Example:
An apartment complex that offers tenants ample, unassigned parking must honor a request from a mobility-impaired tenant for a reserved space near her apartment if necessary to assure that she can have access to her apartment.
However, housing need not be made available to a person who is a direct threat to the health or safety of others or who currently uses illegal drugs.

In buildings that are ready for first occupancy after March 13, 1991, and have an elevator and four or more units:

  • Public and common areas must be accessible to persons with disabilities.
  • Doors and hallways must be wide enough for wheelchairs.

All units must have:

  • An accessible route into and through the unit
  • Accessible light switches, electrical outlets, thermostats and other environmental controls
  • Reinforced bathroom walls to allow later installation of grab bars and
  • Kitchens and bathrooms that can be used by people in wheelchairs

If a building with four or more units has no elevator and will be ready for first occupancy after March 13, 1991, these standards apply to ground floor units. These requirements for new buildings do not replace any more stringent standards in State or local law.

Unless a building or community qualifies as housing for older persons, it may not discriminate based on familial status. That is, it may not discriminate against families in which one or more children under 18 live with:

  • A parent
  • A person who has legal custody of the child or children or the designee of the parent or legal custodian, with the parent or custodian's written permission

Familial status protection also applies to pregnant women and anyone securing legal custody of a child under 18.

Exemption:
Housing for older persons is exempt from the prohibition against familial status discrimination if:

  • The HUD Secretary has determined that it is specifically designed for and occupied by elderly persons under a Federal, State or local government program or
  • It is occupied solely by persons who are 62 or older or
  • It houses at least one person who is 55 or older in at least 80 percent of the occupied units; has significant services and facilities for older persons; and adheres to a published policy statement that demonstrates an intent to house persons who are 55 or older. The requirement for significant services and facilities is waived if providing them is not practicable and the housing is necessary to provide important housing opportunities for older persons.

A transition period permits residents on or before September 13, 1988, to continue living in the housing, regardless of their age, without interfering with the exemption.

HUD is ready to help with any problem of housing discrimination. If you think your rights have been violated, you may fill out a Housing Discrimination Complaint form, write HUD a letter, or telephone the HUD Hotline. You have one year after an alleged violation to file a complaint with HUD, but you should file it as soon as possible.

Online Assistance:

What to Tell HUD:

  • Your name and address
  • The name and address of the person your complaint is against (the respondent)
  • The address or other identification of the housing involved
  • A short description of the alleged violation (the event that caused you to believe your rights were violated)
  • The date(s) of the alleged violation

Where to Write:
Send the Housing Discrimination Complaint Form or a letter to the HUD office nearest you or to:

  • Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity
    U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
    Room 5204
    Washington, D.C. 20410-2000
  • or
  • Town of Colonie
    Community Development
    Memorial Town Hall
    P.O. Box 508
    Newtonville, NY 12128

Where to Call:
If you wish, you may use the toll-free Hotline number: 1-800-669-9777. (In Washington, D.C. call 708-0836).

If you are disabled:
HUD also provides:

  • A toll-free TDD phone for the hearing impaired: 1-800-927-9275. (In Washington, D.C., call 708-0836.)
  • Interpreters
  • Tapes and Braille materials
  • Assistance in reading and completing forms

HUD will notify you when it receives your complaint. Normally, HUD also will:

  • Notify the alleged violator of your complaint and permit that person to submit an answer
  • Investigate your complaint and determine whether there is reasonable cause to believe the Fair Housing Act has been violated
  • Notify you if it cannot complete an investigation within 100 days of receiving your complaint

Conciliation:
HUD will try to reach an agreement with the person your complaint is against (the respondent). A conciliation agreement must protect both you and the public interest. If an agreement is signed, HUD will take no further action on your complaint. However, if HUD has reasonable cause to believe that a conciliation agreement is breached, HUD will recommend that the Attorney General file suit.

Complaint Referrals:
If HUD has determined that your State or local agency has the same fair housing powers as HUD, HUD will refer your complaint to that agency for investigation and notify you of the referral. That agency must begin work on your complaint within 30 days or HUD may take it back.

What If You Need Help Quickly?
If you need immediate help to stop a serious problem that is being caused by a Fair Housing Act violation, HUD may be able to assist you as soon as you file a complaint. HUD may authorize the Attorney General to go to court to seek temporary or preliminary relief, pending the outcome of your complaint, if:

  • Irreparable harm is likely to occur without HUD's intervention
  • There is substantial evidence that a violation of the Fair Housing Act occurred

Example:
A builder agrees to sell a house but, after learning the buyer is black, fails to keep the agreement. The buyer files a complaint with HUD. HUD may authorize the Attorney General to go to court to prevent a sale to any other buyer until HUD investigates the complaint.

If, after investigating your complaint, HUD finds reasonable cause to believe that discrimination occurred, it will inform you. Your case will be heard in an administrative hearing within 120 days, unless you or the respondent want the case to be heard in Federal District Court. Either way, there is no cost to you.

The Administrative Hearing:
If your case goes to an administrative hearing, HUD attorneys will litigate the case on your behalf. You may intervene in the case and be represented by your own attorney if you wish. An Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) will consider evidence from you and the respondent. If the ALJ decides that discrimination occurred, the respondent can be ordered:

  • To compensate you for actual damages, including humiliation, pain and suffering
  • To provide injunctive or other equitable relief, for example, to make the housing available to you
  • To pay the Federal Government a civil penalty to vindicate the public interest. The maximum penalties are $10,000 for a first violation and $50,000 for a third violation within seven years
  • To pay reasonable attorney's fees and costs

Federal District Court:
If you or the respondent choose to have your case decided in Federal District Court, the Attorney General will file a suit and litigate it on your behalf. Like the ALJ, the District Court can order relief, and award actual damages, attorney's fees and costs. In addition, the court can award punitive damages.

In Addition, You May File Suit:
You may file suit, at your expense, in Federal District Court or State Court within two years of an alleged violation. If you cannot afford an attorney, the Court may appoint one for you. You may bring suit even after filing a complaint, if you have not signed a conciliation agreement and an Administrative Law Judge has not started a hearing. A court may award actual and punitive damages and attorney's fees and costs.

Other Tools to Combat Housing Discrimination:
If there is noncompliance with the order of an Administrative Law Judge, HUD may seek temporary relief, enforcement of the order or a restraining order in a United States Court of Appeals.
The Attorney General may file a suit in a Federal District Court if there is reasonable cause to believe a pattern or practice of housing discrimination is occurring.

The Fair Housing Act and HUD's regulations contain more detail and technical information. If you need a copy of the law or regulations, contact the HUD office nearest you or:

  • Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity Room 5116
    Department of Housing and Urban Development
    451 Seventh Street, S. W.
    Washington, D.C. 20410-2000
    (202) 708-2878
Consolidated Annual Performance & Evaluation Report

Download the Report.

Lead-Based Paint Information

Lead is a bluish-gray metal used in many household and industrial items. It was added to paint to improve its durability and drying characteristics. In 1955, the industry adopted a voluntary standard limiting lead content in paint to no more than one percent by weight. This was gradually reduced and in 1978, the federal government banned lead paint altogether. Nevertheless, it is estimated that lead-based paint is still present in 64 million homes today (approximately three-quarters of the housing in the United States built before 1978). This paint poses little risk if it is left alone and is in good condition. People originally believed that lead exposure was limited to children chewing on window sills. It has been documented, however, that a greater exposure results from remodeling activities.

To protect the public from the dangers of lead from paint, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has issued federal regulations implementing sections of Title X of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 (Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992) that became effective September 15, 2000.

Scientific research has found that exposure to lead in dust is the most common way young children become lead poisoned. Therefore, the new regulation requires dust testing after paint is disturbed to make sure the home is lead-safe. Specific requirements depend on whether the housing is being disposed of or assisted by the federal government, and also the type and amount of financial assistance, the age of the structure, and whether the dwelling is rental or owner-occupied.

For more information about lead:

The following links will provide additional information on the hazards of lead-based paint and the Residential Lead-Based Pain Hazard Reduction Act of 1992:

Census 2010

The 2010 Census represented the most massive participation movement ever witnessed in this country. Approximately 74 percent of the households returned their census forms by mail; the remaining households were counted by census workers walking neighborhoods throughout the United States . The result was a successful count that came in on time and well under budget, with a final 2010 Census savings of $1.87 million. With a participation rate of 83 percent, the Town of Colonie ranked among the top 50 municipalities with a population of 50,000 or more.

On December 21, 2010, the US Census Bureau released the first results from Census 2010 showing the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2010, was 308,745,538, an increase of 9.7 percent over the 281,421,906 persons counted during the 2000 census. Detailed results of Census 2010 are being made available in numerous data products (Redistricting Data Summary File, 2010 Census Briefs, Demographic Profile, Summary File 1, Summary File 2, Summary Population and Housing Characteristics Report, and Population and Housing Unit Counts Report). This data is being released on a flow basis through 2013.

Data Product Release Date Description Covered Census Geographies
2010 Census Briefs February 2011 Summary statistics on counts for the total population, for the population 18 years and over, population counts by race and by Hispanic or Latino origin, housing unit counts by occupancy status Multiple geographies within a state, such as census blocks, tracts, voting districts, cities, counties, and school districts
Census 2010 Redistricting Public Law 94-171 Summary File March 2011 – February 2012 First analysis of 2010 Census population and housing topics and include graphs and tables N/A
Demographic Profile Summary File May 2011 Topics such as sex, age, race, Hispanic or Latino origin, household relationship, household type, group quarters population, housing occupancy, housing tenure Place/functioning minor civil divisions
Summary File 1 (SF 1) June 2011 – August 2011 Data focusing on age, sex, households, families, relationship to householder, housing units, detailed race and Hispanic or Latino origin groups, and group quarters Block or census tract level
Summary File 2 (SF 2) December 2011 – April 2012 Detailed tables on age, sex, households, families, relationship to householder, housing units, and group quarters Census tract level
Summary Population and Housing Characteristics Report May 2012 and December 2012 Data tables on age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, households, families, housing tenure and occupancy, population density, and area measurements Place level
Population and Housing Unit Counts Report April 2013 – September 2013 Data tables providing selected historical population and housing unit counts Place level
The American Community Survey

The traditional Census that Americans have been familiar with in past decades has been greatly modified. In 2000, the Census process actually included two forms, the “short” form and the “long” form. The short form contained those questions asked of every household and person to fulfill the Constitutional requirement of a headcount and the data necessary for the Voting Rights Act. The long form was where the Census Bureau obtained all of the detailed socioeconomic characteristics of the population. For 2010, the long form has been eliminated. The 2010 Census questionnaire contained only seven questions of each individual: name, relationship to the householder, sex, age, Hispanic origin, race, and owner/renter status. This shortened form was made possible by the introduction of the American Community Survey (ACS).

The ACS is a massive national survey of 250,000 households every month. On an annual basis this nationwide sample size is roughly equivalent to the old decennial Census long form. It is smaller though, and that has important implications especially for small population areas. In order to obtain reliable samples, the Census Bureau has to compile survey responses over a 3- or 5-year period depending on the population size of an area. As a result, some geographic areas receive updated characteristic estimates every year, three years, and five years, others receive updated characteristic estimates every three years and five years, while others only receive these estimates every five years.

In 2010 three types of estimates from the ACS were available for municipalities like Colonie with populations of 65,000 and over: 1-year estimates (based on data collected in a single year), 3-year estimates (based on data collected in three consecutive years), and 5-year estimates (based on data collected in five consecutive years). Therefore, Colonie now has three estimates for any given release year. Although this sounds like a gold mine for data users, too much data does present certain challenges. For example, using 2010 release data for the Town, there is 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year estimates for any single characteristics like median household income, vacancy rate, or monthly housing costs. With three different estimates to choose from for any given characteristic, some analyst question the reliability of the data and are concerned that communities will pick and choose data from multi-year and single-year estimates in order to meet criteria for programs. Also, although ACS provides more timely data, since the sample size is smaller than the decennial census long form it replaced; there is a greater sampling error than the long form which again leads critics to question its reliability.

Finally, ACS data is best used for examining the distributions of characteristics, not the actual data values. This is complicated by factors like sample design and weighting. Thus, the rate or percent of any single characteristic is generally a more accurate figure than the absolute number.

The 2010 Census Data and the 2010-2014 American Community Survey can be easily accessed at http://www.cdrpc.org/.

In an attempt to make the voluminous demographic and economic statistics released by the Census Bureau easy to find and use for everyone, the Town of Colonie will be publishing various census results on this site as the data becomes available. If you have any questions regarding the information presented on this site, please contact the Town of Colonie Community Development Department at 783-2718.

Reasonable Accommodation Policy

The Town of Colonie Community Development Department complies with the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) regulations implementing Section 504 (24 CFR Part 8, dated June 2, 1988 ). Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities in any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 ( ADA ) prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities in all services, programs, and activities made available by state and local governments.

The Community Development Department complies with all applicable laws and regulations and is committed to ensuring that all individuals enjoy full access to and can benefit from our programs and services.

Federal law generally requires housing providers to make reasonable accommodation for persons with disabilities. A reasonable accommodation is a change; exception; or adjustment to a rule, policy, practice or service that may be necessary for a person with a disability to have an equal opportunity to use and enjoy a housing unit; access to an agency's facilities, activities or programs; or public and common-use spaces. An applicant with a disability that substantially limits one or more major life activities may apply for a reasonable accommodation with the Community Development Department.

The Community Development Department will review each reasonable accommodation request on a case by case basis. The Community Development Department, however, is not required to take any action that would be a fundamental alteration in the nature of the program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burden. Requests for reasonable accommodation must be made in writing to the Community Development Department, Memorial Town Hall, P.O. Box 508, Newtonville, NY 12128 or by calling 518-785-2718.

The Community Development Department's Reasonable Accommodation Policy and Procedures are posted in the Community Development Department's office located at 534 Loudon Road, Latham , NY 12110.

Questions and requests for copies of the Reasonable Accommodation Policy and Procedures may be directed to the Community Development Program Coordinator at:

Memorial Town Hall
P.O. Box 508
Newtonville , NY 12128

Yes. Colonie participates in the federally funded Section 8 Rental Assistance program.
There are also seven senior citizen subsidized apartment buildings in the Town.

  • Bishop Broderick Apartments
    50 Prescott Street
    Albany, NY 12205
    (518) 869-7441
  • Colonie Terrace Apartments
    2006 Central Avenue
    Albany, NY 12205
    (518) 869-2350
  • Fontbonne Manor Senior Apartments
    10 Carondelet Drive
    Watervliet, New York 12189
    (518) 782-2780
  • Sheehy Manor
    8 Carondelet Drive
    Watervliet, NY 12189
    (518) 782-2350
  • Carondelet Commons Apartments
    40 Delatour Road
    Watervliet, NY 12189
    (518) 783-0444
  • Cabrini Acres Senior Apartment
    4 Carondelet Drive
    Watervliet, NY 12189
    (518) 785-0050
  • Sanderson Court Senior Apartments
    6 Carondelet Drive
    Watervliet, NY 12189
    (518) 782-1123
It is not necessary to live in the Town of Colonie to apply for this grant, but you must purchase a home in the Town.

If you think you may be eligible and would like to be placed on the waiting list, you may call our office at 518-783-2718 or you may download the First Time Homebuyer Application by completing this form
Yes. The waiting time for this program varies, but is approximately one to two years.
A HUD home is a one-to-four unit residence acquired by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development as a result of a foreclosure on a FHA-insured mortgage.

The population of the Town of Colonie including the Village of Colonie and the Village of Menands based on the 2010 Census was 81,591.

  • Town outside Village 69,808
  • Village of Colonie 7,793
  • Village of Menands 3,990
The US Department of Housing and Urban Development determines income eligibility limits for all of the programs administered by Community Development.
Write Us
Our mailing address is:

Town of Colonie
Community Development
P.O. Box 508
Newtonville, NY 12128